Mathew Goad of North Platte was sentenced Thursday for conspiracy and production of child pornography.

Goad, 34, will spend most of his life behind bars. He was sentenced to 40 years in federal prison plus a lifetime of supervised release if he gets out. There is no parole in the federal system.

U.S. Attorney Joe Kelly said in March 2019, a state search warrant was served at the home of a target living in Kansas City, Mo.

During a forensic exam of the computer seized in the Kansas City investigation, the examiners found screenshots of a chat between Goad and the target. In that, Goad indicated he sexually assaulted a child and recorded it, and then he sent the recording to the target, Kelly said.

Further investigation revealed that Goad and his co-defendant, Cory Preitauer, were both involved in the production of the video.

They were living in a camper parked behind a house in the 2900 block of W. 22nd, according to a court affidavit.

Preitauer has been convicted and is awaiting sentencing, Kelly said.

After his arrest, Goad admitted to the production and distribution of the video. Agents examined Goad’s electronic devices, which were seized at the time of his arrest. His laptop contained approximately 3,400 image files and 800 video files of child porn, Kelly said.

Goad will also be required to register as a sex offender and pay $3,600 in restitution under the sentence, which was issued by Chief U.S. District Judge John M. Gerrard.

“The actions of Goad and his co-defendant will have a lifelong effect on this young victim,” Kelly said. “Today’s sentence sends a powerful message to those who prey on the most vulnerable of children.”

“The terrible and deliberate acts of this individual hurt both the victim and victim’s family. While this sentence will never remove this hurt, it should reassure the public that the FBI will vigorously pursue child predators until justice is served and children are rescued,” said FBI Special Agent in Charge Kristi Johnson.

This case was brought as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative to combat the epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse.

The initiative was launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice. Led by United States Attorneys’ Offices and the Criminal Division’s Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section (CEOS), Project Safe Childhood marshals federal, state and local resources to better locate, apprehend and prosecute individuals who exploit children via the Internet, as well as to identify and rescue victims.

For more information about Project Safe Childhood, visit www.projectsafechildhood.gov.

This case was investigated by the Federal Bureau of Investigation.