Due to COVID-19, the 2020 graduating class will never truly have closure on their high school years, but time will not wait.

As always, some will pursue higher education or enlist in the military; others will join the work force.

University officials are concerned that students will shy away from campus life due to the health and safety risks associated with dorm living and their wish to avoid mingling on campus with a multitude of individuals from widespread geographic areas.

They are also concerned that virus-related restrictions on student activities will diminish the price parents are willing to help pay for their child’s college degree.

The University of Nebraska has been proactive in its marketing to try to limit its exposure to an expected decline in enrollment. They have projected a $50 million COVID-related loss in revenues.

To bolster enrollment, they have widened the parameters of their existing “College Bound” tuition-free program for students who qualify for federal Pell grants. The new “Nebraska Promise” program expands the offer to any full-time students whose families have an adjusted income less than $60,000.

The program will cost the University little; instead, they hope it will generate revenue by filling empty classroom seats. The tuition cost for the minimum full-time 12 credit hours is $3,024 — about 30% of the total cost. Students also pay $1,000 in fees, nearly $6,000 in room and board and more for instructional material and parking.

From those students, the University will receive revenue of approximately $3,000 in Pell grant money, another $2,000 from the Nebraska Opportunity Grant program and private scholarships, plus the portion of the cost the student pays. At a minimum, the University will pick up $7,500 in income for an otherwise empty classroom seat.

It is a well-thought-out marketing plan with the added public relations benefit garnered from offering middle-income students financial help.

For many families harmed by the government-caused economic recession, the Nebraska Promise isn’t enough. Affordability still stands between them and their child’s educational dreams. There is good news, however.

The scare of COVID -19 has renewed focus on the affordable educational opportunities available at Nebraska’s six community colleges and three state colleges. Due to taxpayer support, the University of Nebraska is one of the lowest-cost public universities in the nation. That said, a degree from a community or state college can cost up to 40% less. When compared to a private or out-of-state public college, the savings can be the difference in owning a home or paying off student loans.

Additional savings for travel and room and board expenses can be had by staying close to home.

Educational opportunities abound. Distance and online learning, now touted as the future of education, has been used for almost two decades by these institutions to increase access for students. For example, a student at Mid-Plains Community College can live in a dorm or at home, take all or part of their classes online or in a classroom, and fit their studies around their job.

They can then obtain a certificate in a high-paying trade, gain an associate’s degree or obtain an all-purpose business degree. A student can pick up their general studies requirements for a planned four-year degree and when ready can easily transfer into a bachelor’s degree program offered by Chadron State or Bellevue University, both of which have offices on the Mid-Plains main campus.

In fact, most universities, including the University of Nebraska system, offer courses for undergraduate degrees online to stay competitive. Similar opportunities are available on or from college campuses across Nebraska in communities like Norfolk, Scottsbluff, Hastings, Milford, Omaha, Peru, Chadron, or Wayne.

With technology, the world is not as big as it was. The old university sales pitch of offering students an expanded world view does not hold the promise it used to.

In order to gain the world, a student no longer needs to strangle their future with student loan debt. The world is a lot friendlier place to a young adult with a degree in hand, low student debt and character forged in hometown Nebraska.

 

Mike Groene represents Lincoln County – Dist. 42 — in the state legislature. Contact him at mgroene@leg.ne.gov or 402-471-2729.